Legacies, Individuality, and Hope: About “Star Wars”

Every now and then, I expand my dialogue about storytelling by going beyond the boundaries of books and out into the mediums of TV and film. I do so by doing these analysis pieces once in a while about a TV show or film that has reached a significant time in its history (i.e. series premiere, series finale, film release, anniversary of a release, etc.). Previously, I shared my thoughts about the beloved Studio Ghibli film, “Kiki’s Delivery Service.” Today, to commemorate the final entry into the Skywalker saga, I shall discuss my latest takeaways from this beloved space opera, “Star Wars.

WARNING: There will be SPOILERS from “The Rise of Skywalker.” Stop reading now if you haven’t seen the film yet and do not want it spoiled for you. Continue reading “Legacies, Individuality, and Hope: About “Star Wars””

Storytelling and the Moon

Earlier this week, I went to the Exploratorium; a San Francisco-based museum where visitors get different perspectives on the world by way of the sciences and the arts. Every week, they open up the Exploratorium for an adults-only event called After Dark, and each one always provides presentations, performances, and such around a different topic. For this week, it was all the science of the different stories that exist regarding the moon. Continue reading “Storytelling and the Moon”

“Spirited Away” vs. “Toy Story 4”: Time Traveling Cinema and Nostalgia

It’s been a few weeks since this happened, and I cannot deny how fascinated I am by the occurrence. I’ve never really heard of anything like this happening before, and the fact that the results wound up being the way they are is both unsurprising but also equally intriguing. Let me break it down for you: Continue reading ““Spirited Away” vs. “Toy Story 4”: Time Traveling Cinema and Nostalgia”

Outlook on the Oscars (From the POV of a Screenwriter)

We are now one day away from the 91st Annual Academy Awards. We’re one day away, and already leading up to it, so much has been going on. It had a host, and then it didn’t have a host (though, in my not so humble opinion, I don’t think it’s a huge loss, for most of the hosts in recent years have been very unfunny). Four of the categories were set to be aired, and then they were only going to be done during the commercial breaks, but there was enough of an uproar to leave it on the air. The Oscars this year are… somewhat less White than previous years, and the woman who created the campaign that I’m referring to, April Reign, will be attending the ceremony for her first time. Continue reading “Outlook on the Oscars (From the POV of a Screenwriter)”

What Did I Miss?: October 2018

Hey everyone!

I hope you’ve all been doing well since I announced my hiatus. While you’re receiving this message now, I’m actually writing it out a few weeks in advance, and I can imagine that I’m really benefiting from this time away from the blog.

In any case, as mentioned in my hiatus announcement, starting this month and going forward, I’m having these “What Did I Miss?” posts appear on a monthly basis rather than a weekly basis. While I think I was wise in starting these series of posts last year, I’m not sure if a weekly basis is really the best schedule for it, for there are times where the list is very short – like, one item short. So I think releasing them all in one post covering an entire month will be a lot more sufficient going forward, and I hope you think so too.

In which case, here is what you missed for the month of October: Continue reading “What Did I Miss?: October 2018”

Playwright’s Commentary: “Infinite Range”

This year is my second consecutive year of having a one-act play I’ve written be featured in “Stories High;” Bindlestiff Studio’s annual showcase of new works being performed, by way of writing, acting, and directing workshops coming together.

“Infinite Range” is the name of my play, and at the time of writing this blog post, I’ve yet to see it in its final form. Much like I’ve done in the past, today I want to go  over the inspiration, the conception, and the creation of this script. Continue reading “Playwright’s Commentary: “Infinite Range””

What Did I Miss?: The One Day Early Edition (August 5th-11th)

I pause today from my regular blog post. It’s been a busy few days, and starting next week, things are about to get even busier.

I would, however, like to you remind you all that “Stories High XVIII” begins its run next Thursday at Bindlestiff Studio. If you are interested in going, you can buy your tickets here.

In addition, I will be appearing at the Local Authors Book Fair two weeks from today at the Mountain View Public Library. It’s a free event, and so if you are in the area, I hope you come out to that as well.

And with that, here is what you missed: Continue reading “What Did I Miss?: The One Day Early Edition (August 5th-11th)”

The Layers and Genuine Storytelling in “Cobra Kai”

A few years ago, I started making the effort to expand my dialogue about storytelling by going beyond the boundaries of books and out into the mediums of TV and film. I do so by doing these analysis pieces once a while about a TV show or film that has reached a significant time in its history (i.e. series premiere, series finale, film release, anniversary of a release, etc.). Previously, I did an overview of the TV show, “Star Wars Rebels,” following its series finale. Today, in honor the release of its entire first season, I shall be entering the world of online streaming for the first time by taking a look at the latest addition to “The Karate Kid” saga that has been, rightfully, drawing in all the praise. Today, I’m talking about the YouTube Red series, “Cobra Kai.”
Continue reading “The Layers and Genuine Storytelling in “Cobra Kai””

An Open Letter to the March for Our Lives Participants

To the participants in the 800+ Marches for Our Lives happening all over the world today:

You shouldn’t have to be doing this. You shouldn’t have to make a statement that you just want to live life without fearing for your end by an AR-15. Those who actually spearheaded today’s movement – the survivors of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting – should be mourning their fallen classmates and staff, healing from this gut-wrenching experience, and focus on getting readjusted to school. If you wanted to take it a step further, the shooting – or any of the mass shootings for that matter – shouldn’t have happened. There should be a lot less broken families in this country and more loved ones still among us. Continue reading “An Open Letter to the March for Our Lives Participants”