Exploring Heritage Through Stories

It’s May now, which means it is now Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month; a month devoted to acknowledge and honor the people, culture, and history of such backgrounds. Programs and celebrations are scheduled to take place and stories shall be exchanged. There’s a certain empowering tone that comes with a month that acknowledges the heritage of people who are just starting to be heard and represented a little better by the mainstream media; whether that be in the form of books, movies or television. In my case scenario, this month serves as a time for me to take a look at my role in it all; not only as amongst the growing number of Asian American female authors out there, but also in terms of looking through the lenses of being Hapa (an individual of part Asian descent).

Continue reading “Exploring Heritage Through Stories”

8 Questions for Sarah Dayan

Today I’m taking a little breather from talking about A Moment’s Worth and am, instead, providing the next interview of my interview series.  Two weeks prior to the release of my book, indie author Sarah Dayan celebrated a similar accomplishment when her debut novel, Greater Than the Still, became available for purchase.  Today, we will learn a bit more about the making of the novel, as well as her journey as a writer.

To give a bit of background info about her, Sarah Dayan was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, where she still resides to this day.  She is incredibly well-traveled, and has written about many of the places she’s been to for Toonari Post.  Other hobbies of hers include playing the piano and guitar, photography, and giving in to her sweet tooth.  You can learn more about her on her website and you can follow her on Twitter.  Be sure to also like the Facebook page for Greater Than the Still as well.

photo provided by Sarah Dayan
photo provided by Sarah Dayan

Continue reading “8 Questions for Sarah Dayan”

Thoughts About Identifying As An Author

“So, we have a real live author for you guys.”

Those were the words (or a statement that was something along those lines anyway) that my editor said when she introduced me before an audience of high school juniors and seniors at the continuation school she volunteers at.  About a month ago, she had the students enrolled in the drama class put on a stage adaptation (with my permission, of course) of one of the chapters from A Moment’s Worth.  I was there in attendance, only to follow up afterwards by partaking in a three-minute Q&A session.

It’s that statement that gets to me, and maybe it even got to some of the students as well; that I was identified as an author, a real live author.  For me, that’s a weird thing to process.  The title of “author” has always sounded really pro to me; like a title given to those who are high up on a non-existing caste system.  Not to mention that while the title is often used for those who produce written content- in particular books- the general definition of an author is anyone who is the maker/creator/originator of  anything. Continue reading “Thoughts About Identifying As An Author”

Representation and Diversity Through Books

It’s Day 3 of the #WeNeedDiverseBooks campaign, and when not being occupied by schoolwork, I partake in it with my own contributions in social media, as well as checking out some of the others by other people (some of them coming from my favorite authors).  It was such brilliant timing when I heard about it, because it’s a subject that I’m really passionate about, and really involved in.

That’s right, you heard me.  Let’s talk about race. Continue reading “Representation and Diversity Through Books”