Reflection on a Celebration of “Star Wars” Stories

(Before I dive into today’s topic, I do want to acknowledge the fact that yes, I am aware that it’s been about a month since I did one of my regular blog posts. That was unplanned, but trust me when I say that I have a really good reason for doing so. Aside from work having been busier than usual at my day job, I also have been hard at work on a project I am writing. It hasn’t been officially announced yet, but stay tuned. Something is coming very soon.)

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Playwright’s Commentary: “Not in Kansas”

I’m thrilled to take part in my third production with Rainy Day Artistic Collective with my new one-act play, “Not in Kansas.” Based on real life experiences of my great aunt, Justita, the story follows two PhD students from the Philippines who’re studying in the United States in the early 1950’s. While on a trip to New Orleans, the two experience the opposite of Southern hospitality at a rest stop in Mississippi. Continue reading “Playwright’s Commentary: “Not in Kansas””

Coming Next Week: Halfway Historical Festival feat. “Not in Kansas”

I’m excited to reveal that after the past few months of working on this, we are now one week away from my third production with Rainy Day Artistic Collective. This time, I’ve written one of ten plays that will be featured in their Halfway Historical Festival; where all the stories revolve around real-life occurrences. Continue reading “Coming Next Week: Halfway Historical Festival feat. “Not in Kansas””

Book Bans and Reconstructing a Book’s Role: Recommended Reading

Back in 2016, I wrote a blog post at the tail end of Banned Books Week, where I analyzed a list a books I saw in a bookstore that have been banned or, at least, challenged, over the years. I mention this as we see a rise in even more books being challenged or banned; several of them for reasons where if such bans are successfully, can lead to some dangerous, long-term consequences for the audiences for whom said books are being taken away from. Most notably in recent time, Art Spiegelman’s graphic novel, Maus, which centers on the author’s family’s experiences living through the Holocaust, was unanimously banned by a school board in Tennessee from its eighth grade curriculum.

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