An Exploration of Thought and Poetry: Recommended Viewing

The nominations for the 92nd Academy Awards were announced earlier this week, and I’ll be frank when I say that a number of the people and films whose names are on the list this year I’m both disappointed about and don’t really care for either. One of those films is “Marriage Story;” a film that I, surprisingly, have seen. But ever since “The Rise of Skywalker,” I now see Adam Driver in a new light, which led me to watching this now Oscar-nominated film.

Overall, I’m indifferent about it, and yet within that span of time, I somehow came across the title of another film Driver did a few years ago called “Paterson.” Intrigued by the trailer, I decided to check it out from the library. I’ve since watched it twice and now, I want to make it the first featured material for Recommended Analyzing for the year. Continue reading “An Exploration of Thought and Poetry: Recommended Viewing”

What Did I Miss?: January 2019

Published Works

Review of Rainbirds by Clarissa Goenawan – For Goodreads, I give my general impression of this author’s debut novel and how fans of Haruki Murakami’s works will most surely fall into this one.

Review of The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon – For Goodreads, I present my thoughts on this second work by this thoughtful-minded YA author.

Review of Enlightenment by Reno Ursal – For Goodreads, I go over my opinions on this author’s debut novel that mixes Filipino history and folklore with a destiny of epic proportions.

Appearances

To the Cast & Crew of So Weird: Video Celebration – My spoken word piece I wrote and performed for #SoWeird20 is featured in this video compilation. My appearance starts at 7:40.

What Did I Miss?: December 2018

Published Works

About Baybayin – For Surat Magazine – the very first publication written entirely in Baybayin in over 50 years – I contribute a poem on how learning this script writing system has contributed to my overall understanding of my Filipino heritage.

This is the Only SNL Skit Featuring Jason Momoa You Need to Watch – For YOMYOMF, I spotlight a very particular skit from the night actor Jason Momoa was the guest host for “Saturday Night Live.”

SIGNAL ROCK Sheds Light on Philippines’ Toxic Patriarchal System – For last month’s Cinematografo International Film Festival, I explore how this year’s opening night film gives a glimpse at the long embedded patriarchal attitudes that still exist in the Philippines.

A Grimy, Working Class Singapore Unfolds in “A Land Imagined” – For last month’s Cinematografo International Film Festival, I explore how this year’s closing night film shows another side of Singapore from the one seen in “Crazy Rich Asians.”

The Cast of “The Debut” Reflect on Film’s 18th Anniversary – For last month’s Cinematografo International Film Festival, I interview several of the cast members of this groundbreaking film, as they look back on their experiences of making it.

Judith Hill Releases Postponed Music Video for “Back in Time” – For YOMYOMF, I shed a light on an old yet new music video that is released two years and eight months after it was supposed to originally come out.

Gene Cajayon Discusses His Journey in Filmmaking and the Making of “The Debut” – For last month’s Cinematografo International Film Festival, I speak with the film’s director about the 18 years since its release.

CRAZY RICH ASIANS and AQUAMAN: The Significance of Their Timing– For YOMYOMF, I spotlight the personal significance on the fact that “Crazy Rich Asians” and “Aquaman” came out the same year and what they did for me in terms of representation.

Appearances

YOMYOMF Blockbuster Showdown: AQUAMAN – The Offenders and I close out the year by sharing our thoughts on one of the better films to come out of the DC Extended Universe.

Enlightenment Blog Feature on Lola By The Bay! – Author Reno Ursal shouts out this blog and the post I did about him and his upcoming novel, Enlightenment.

 

Thoughts About Music By Way of Poetry

We are at the end of April now, and so naturally, National Poetry Month is simultaneously wrapping up. Apart from occasional haikus and features about various poets, for whatever reason, there hasn’t been a lot regarding this month-long celebration that has popped up on my radar. Whether that be because of everything that’s been going on for me this month, the political climate, or something else entirely, I don’t know. However, I do want to take a minute to appreciate that value of this month’s focus, and link it to its unique relationship with another medium with a kindred spirit: music. Continue reading “Thoughts About Music By Way of Poetry”

Bruce Lee and Poetry: Recommended Listening

It’s been a while since I’ve had a blog post fall on a holiday, and never before has it fallen on the day of two holidays might I add. For those who celebrate Christmas: Merry Christmas Eve! For those who celebrate Hanukkah: Happy Hanukkah! For those don’t celebrate either: I hope you are having a good day anyway. For those who are hurting this holiday season: I feel for you.

As seen from this past week, this stink of a year that is 2016 refuses to let up, even during the holiday season. The electoral college has basically set up our country for failure these next four years by finalizing Trump as our next president (stupid heads!), the man himself is already posing as a national and international threat by speaking about how the U.S. should expand its nuclear ability, and “Star Wars” fans everywhere received a scare when Carrie Fisher suffered a heart attack yesterday. Continue reading “Bruce Lee and Poetry: Recommended Listening”

How NOT to Write Poetry

It’s another one of those days where I didn’t intend for today’s topic to be what it is. In a way, it comes at really bad timing, for this month is National Poetry Month. But at the same time, I can see how it’s kind of good it has happened this month, for what I’m about to discuss sets an example as to how not to write poetry. Poetry should be exciting, thrilling, touching, thought-provoking, engaging; but when it comes to choosing subject matter and how to go about it, a word of caution: Don’t do what Calvin Trillin did. Continue reading “How NOT to Write Poetry”

How NOT to Choose a Pseudonym

With every fiber of my being, I planned for a much more uplifting post for this week, after previously giving reading material and my thoughts about the piece. However, after hearing about a particular schmuck of a poet who, despite his actions, still has work featured in this year’s Best American Poetry anthology, I knew I had to give my input on this subject matter.

This week saw the release of the annual Best American Poetry anthology, and as discovered quickly from a not so subtle reveal in the bio section, it turns out that poet Yi-Fen Chou is not who he says he is. Chou is actually a pseudonym for a man named Michael Derrick Hudson. Regardless of Hudson’s explanation regarding his choice in publishing under the name- which would do you wonders to check out here– as well as the anthology’s editor’s rather lengthy explanation for why his work remained to be included- there is something very wrong with this picture.

Continue reading “How NOT to Choose a Pseudonym”

Thoughts About Poetry (In Honor of National Poetry Month)

February and March have their respective celebrations of Black History Month and Women’s History Month, and next month will be of a similar case for it will be Asian Pacific American Heritage Month.  However, did you know that the month of April holds a celebration of its own?  It celebrates people, though not defined by race or sex, but rather by pursuit and passion.  It brings awareness and appreciation to the passion that such people pursue.  April is National Poetry Month. Continue reading “Thoughts About Poetry (In Honor of National Poetry Month)”

8 Questions for Gretchen Carvajal

It’s a new day of a new year and to start things off for 2015, I figured I have a voice featured today of someone other than my own.  It’s been a while since I last released an interview on here, so I thought it would be nice to do that again.  As to the person who’s featured this time around, that honor goes to an incredible spoken word artist whom I’ve known since high school: Gretchen Carvajal.

Gretchen is more than just a fellow writer; she is someone whom I’ve always known for never hiding her voice, however that may be.  She expresses her art and her stories through the means of being a writer, artist, emcee, and performer.  She was born in the Philippines before moving to the San Francisco Bay Area when she was very young.  She is currently a student in the First Wave program at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.  She has partaken in many spoken word competitions over the years- including the national youth competition, Brave New Voices, when she was 17- and was recently a participant in The Ill List; the signature poetry slam invitational in Modesto, California.  She already has a chapbook under her belt called Daughter of the Sun and plans to write more books in the future to come.  To learn more about her, be sure to check her out on Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube
Continue reading “8 Questions for Gretchen Carvajal”