What Did I Miss?: July 2019

Published Works

Review of Unsung Heroine by Sarah Kuhn – For Goodreads, I provide my impressions on this novella companion to this author’s beloved super heroine trilogy.

Director Lulu Wang Explores Telling a Story Based on an Actual Lie in “The Farewell” – For the Center for Asian American Media, I sat down with this thoughtful director on the making of this very moving film.

From Fan to Writer: F.C. Yee on Developing the Story of Avatar Kyoshi – For The Nerds of Color, I got deep and geeky with this author/Avatar fan about the honor (*wink*) of writing the first YA novel in the Avatar universe.

The Circle of Life of “He Lives in You” from ‘The Lion King’ – For The Nerds of Color, I give an overview of the different iterations over the years of this underrated yet powerful song from “The Lion King” repertoire.

Review of The Rise of Kyoshi by F.C. Yee – For Goodreads, I explain why fans of “Avatar: The Last Airbender” will relish in this novel about one of the most incredible avatars prior to Aang.

‘Cobra Kai’ Has Got to Step Up Its Representation Game in Season 3 – For The Nerds of Color, I address a flaw this YouTube series has had over the course of its first two seasons, in the midst of a recent reveal about what’s to come in the new season.

Appearances

Lauren (San Francisco Bay Area, California) – I recently shared my experience for Mixed (Me)dia about being a mixed race person, by explaining a little bit about who I am, my thoughts about being mixed race, and advice for those who’re navigating their own mixed race journeys.

Writers’ Spotlight: Summer 2019 – Asienne Magazine gives previews to two separate interviews that were done with two California-based Filipino American writers (I being one of them).

Other News

CAAM Production of Wayne Wang’s “Coming Home Again” to World Premiere at TIFF – A film I briefly worked on last year, “Coming Home Again,” will be having its world premiere at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival.

In Search of an Asian American Outlet (Pt. II)

It has now been about a month since YOMYOMF shut down. While I haven’t devoted a lot of time to looking for a new outlet to contribute to due to other obligations, the little bit of hunting I have done has come up short. There are quite a few Asian American-focused outlets. It’s just that there aren’t a lot of them that offer opportunities for contributors to come and share their thoughts and takes on everything happening within the community. Continue reading “In Search of an Asian American Outlet (Pt. II)”

In Search of an Asian American Outlet

2019 begins on somewhat of a bittersweet note. In case you haven’t already heard, the daily blog for You Offend Me You Offend My Family (YOMYOMF) has been shut down. As revealed in the message on the site, with many projects in both traditional and new media in various stages of production, it has become too difficult for the founders and creators to also uphold the daily blog as well. YOMYOMF will continue to have an active presence on social media; specifically on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Continue reading “In Search of an Asian American Outlet”

What Did I Miss?: December 2018

Published Works

About Baybayin – For Surat Magazine – the very first publication written entirely in Baybayin in over 50 years – I contribute a poem on how learning this script writing system has contributed to my overall understanding of my Filipino heritage.

This is the Only SNL Skit Featuring Jason Momoa You Need to Watch – For YOMYOMF, I spotlight a very particular skit from the night actor Jason Momoa was the guest host for “Saturday Night Live.”

SIGNAL ROCK Sheds Light on Philippines’ Toxic Patriarchal System – For last month’s Cinematografo International Film Festival, I explore how this year’s opening night film gives a glimpse at the long embedded patriarchal attitudes that still exist in the Philippines.

A Grimy, Working Class Singapore Unfolds in “A Land Imagined” – For last month’s Cinematografo International Film Festival, I explore how this year’s closing night film shows another side of Singapore from the one seen in “Crazy Rich Asians.”

The Cast of “The Debut” Reflect on Film’s 18th Anniversary – For last month’s Cinematografo International Film Festival, I interview several of the cast members of this groundbreaking film, as they look back on their experiences of making it.

Judith Hill Releases Postponed Music Video for “Back in Time” – For YOMYOMF, I shed a light on an old yet new music video that is released two years and eight months after it was supposed to originally come out.

Gene Cajayon Discusses His Journey in Filmmaking and the Making of “The Debut” – For last month’s Cinematografo International Film Festival, I speak with the film’s director about the 18 years since its release.

CRAZY RICH ASIANS and AQUAMAN: The Significance of Their Timing– For YOMYOMF, I spotlight the personal significance on the fact that “Crazy Rich Asians” and “Aquaman” came out the same year and what they did for me in terms of representation.

Appearances

YOMYOMF Blockbuster Showdown: AQUAMAN – The Offenders and I close out the year by sharing our thoughts on one of the better films to come out of the DC Extended Universe.

Enlightenment Blog Feature on Lola By The Bay! – Author Reno Ursal shouts out this blog and the post I did about him and his upcoming novel, Enlightenment.

 

Thoughts About Making Mistakes in Writing

(This is something I meant to write about prior to my hiatus.)

A few months ago, when the final trailer for “Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindlewald” was released, it was revealed that the mysterious character that actor Claudia Kim would be portraying in the film is Nagini; the (eventual) pet snake and servant of Lord Voldemort. A mixed reaction erupted as a result, with people saying how having the only Asian character in the entire film was cast as someone whose humanity is destroyed overtime, along with all the old stereotypes attached to the role, was poorly done. Others begged to differ. Continue reading “Thoughts About Making Mistakes in Writing”

The First Time(s) I Saw Me

Another hashtag has emerged over the past week where its relevancy rings true with the topics I address on this blog, and so therefore, I want to dwell into it. The hashtag is #TheFirstTimeISawMe. Diversity and representation of different lives – by way of race, sexuality, specific characteristics, etc. – matter, and Netflix started up this thread to celebrate inclusive media and diverse programming. If you look through the hashtag on Twitter, you’ll see people recall instances of the first times they saw someone like them onscreen, as well as people who are still waiting for that moment to happen.

Continue reading “The First Time(s) I Saw Me”

Why I Include LGBT Characters in My Novels

Judging from the title of this week’s blog post, it might be a bit of a head scratcher to start off the new year with this particular topic. However, I found it necessary to do so, for a specific reason. A week ago, someone (who shall remain nameless) had written a review on An Absolute Mind, and had quite a number of things to say about it – and not exactly in a positive light, might I add. But what infuriated me was when this individual referred to the same-sex relationships presented in the novel as a “lifestyle.”

Since discovering this review, I’ve wracked my mind over what I can do about it; not that I would normally jump on anything and everything negative one would say about my novels, but this comment is not criticism of the story itself, but rather one of different proportions. Now I could sit back and be silent, or I could fight back. It’s 2017, so I’m choosing the latter, for I feel that this instance presents itself an opportunity to educate others on why I include LGBT characters in my novels. Continue reading “Why I Include LGBT Characters in My Novels”

Thoughts About the Reception of Indie Authors

As the market for e-publishing and easy access to doing so independently is constantly emerging in today’s age, it’s hard to for people to consider any inequality of any sorts when really us indie authors have the upper advantage over authors who are signed to a publishing house.  We have more control over the content of our books, we have control over its distribution, we get to keep more of the money that’s made from it, etc.  However, based on my observations throughout the past few months of being an indie author, there are also some negative side effects that come with being an indie author that’s more so of how we’re viewed and received by the general public, in comparison to our not-so-indie counterparts. Continue reading “Thoughts About the Reception of Indie Authors”